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Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Arms Production in Developing Countries found in the catalog.

Arms Production in Developing Countries

James Everett Katz

Arms Production in Developing Countries

An Analysis of Decision Making

by James Everett Katz

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  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Lexington Books .
Written in


The Physical Object
Number of Pages384
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7629479M
ISBN 100669058726
ISBN 109780669058727

This book analyses the structure and motive forces that shape the global arms transfer and production system. The author distinguishes three tiers of arms producers, defined by such factors as defence production base, military research and development capabilities, and dependence upon arms by: iv Small Arms Survey Occasional Paper 23 Rodgers, Muggah, and Stevenson Gangs of Central America v Occasional Papers 1 Re-Armament in Sierra Leone: One Year after the Lomé Peace Agreement, by Eric Berman, December 2 Removing Small Arms from Society: A Review of Weapons Collection and Destruc- tion Programmes, by Sami Faltas, Glenn McDonald, and .

New production merely creates more second- and third-hand guns. In , 45 different countries reported to the UN that firearms, components and ammunition were legally produced in their territories for domestic or export markets. According to a report for the US congress, arms sales to developing countries together far outweigh arms sales. xi Transnational Crime and the Developing World Executive Summary Overview Transnational crime is a business, and business is very good. Money is the primary motivation for these illegal activities. The revenues generated from the 11 crimes covered in this report—estimated.

The TNCs and arms production: Military alliances serve as enforcers of TNC domination By Mark Frank, CCPA Monitor, March Tony Clarke, in his important book Silent Coup, points out that one of the essential conditions for transnational corporations in developing their investment strategies is the assurance of political stability and security—for them, if not for the . Arguably the most comprehensive and solutions-oriented analysis of critical global economic issues to date was a report by the Independent Commission on International Development Issues, chaired by Willy Brandt (former Chancellor of West Germany) in - widely referred to as the 'Brandt Report'.


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Arms Production in Developing Countries by James Everett Katz Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this book, renowned authorities re-examine the economics of military expenditure, arms production and arms trade in developing nations. It includes analysis of military spending in Africa, Asia and Latin America and new forms of civil conflict as well as nine case studies (Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Mozambique, Angola, Subsaharan Africa.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ross, Andrew L. Arms production in developing countries. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, (OCoLC) Additional Physical Format: Online version: Arms production in developing countries. Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, © (OCoLC) Material Type.

Separate chapters on the armament industries of such countries as Brazil, Israel, Argentina, Egypt, India and China make this a useful volume. Arms production is a growing phenomenon in the Third World, one that is by now recognized but little studied.

A significant addition to the arms-transfer bookshelf. The arms industry, also known as the defense industry or the arms trade, is a global industry which manufactures and sells weapons and military technology, and is a major component of the Military–industrial consists of a commercial industry involved in the research and development, engineering, production, and servicing of military material, equipment, and facilities.

TY - CHAP. T1 - Chapter 30 Arms Industries, Arms Trade, and Developing Countries. AU - Brauer, Jurgen. PY - /12/1. Y1 - /12/1. N2 - This chapter discusses developing (non-high income) states' participation in the production and trade of parts or whole units of major conventional weapons, their integration into a transnationalized global arms Cited by: The creation of arms production programmes in developing countries is one of several new and important trends in the armament of Third World countries that have emerged since the mids.

These production programmes have been associated with a variety of conflicting motives and by: 2. Profound changes are occurring in the structure of arms production in Western Europe.

Concentration is increasing at a fast pace. Small producers are disappearing and even large ones are opting out of the market. The various national arms industries, long operating in protective environments, are rapidly internationalizing.

Three factors combine to bring about this change:. a ban on the production of nuclear arms in the US and the USSR The actual U.S.

goal was to undermine Soviet influence. During the Cold War, the United States supported anti-communist dictators who committed human rights abuses and opposed democratic freedoms.

Abstract. The domestic production of arms in developing countries is — with remarkably few exceptions — a fairly recent phenomenon.

1 The creation of arms production programmes in developing countries has been associated with a variety of conflicting motives and expectations. The first group of these are military and political in nature: it is hoped to increase Author: Herbert Wulf. The latest WMEAT report to include data on the international arms trade covers ACDA, “World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers ,” February 6,p.

Richard F. Grimmett, “Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, ,” CRS Report for Congress, R, September 4,p. Russia also delivered arms and military equipment against debts owed to several foreign countries.

Between and the volume and value of Russian arms transfers collapsed as military-technical cooperation with countries in Central Europe and with friends and treaty partners in developing countries was sharply reduced.

The book presents detailed analyses of all the arms-producing countries in Western Europe. In addition to describing recent changes, the authors speculate on the implications of these for the balance of power in Western Europe, the relations between Western Europe and the United States, arms exports to the Third World, and problems of.

Downloadable (with restrictions). This chapter discusses developing (non-high income) states' participation in the production and trade of parts or whole units of major conventional weapons, their integration into a transnationalized global arms industry, and the underlying industrial prerequisites that make that participation and integration possible.

Academic career. Brauer was a U.S. Institute of Peace Scholar for the academic year He earned a Ph.D. degree in economics in from the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA, with a thesis on “Military Expenditures, Arms Production, and the Economic Performance of Developing Nations.” As fromhe has held a professorship at the business school of then.

“The Arms Industry in Developing Nations: History and Post-Cold War Assessment,” in Brauer, Jurgen and Dunne, J.

(eds.), Arming the South: The Economics of Military Expenditures, Arms Production and Trade in Developing : Christopher J. Coyne. 94 Other measures concerning developing countries in the WTO agreements include: • extra timefor developing countries to fulfil their commitments (in many of the WTO agreements) • provisions designed to increase developing countries’ trading opportunities through greater market access (e.g.

in textiles, services, technical barriers to trade). Economics of Arms Reduction and the Peace Process Klein/Gronicki/Kosaka have addressed the impact of arms reduction in Eastern European countries and the Soviet Union upon their internal economies.

But it is also important to examine the impact of major arms reduction in a number of Western powers upon trade in general.

In the first of. The report typically follows the trends of major arms suppliers, but as was noted in the Grimmett Report, there has been an increase in participation of other non-traditional suppliers, such as Israel, Spain, Sweden and some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers by all suppliers, The principal focus of this report is the.

A RUSA Outstanding Reference Title The Encyclopedia of the Developing World is a comprehensive work on the historical and current status of developing countries.

Containing more than entries, the Encyclopedia encompasses primarily the years since and defines development broadly, addressing not only economics but also civil society and social progress.

the Third World that are creating indigenous arms industries. An estimated twenty-four developing countries produce weapons of some type This is one of the most important aspects of the con­ temporary proliferation of conventional arms. The development of the larger of these new arms industries, and their impact uponCited by: This study contributes to the debate on whether defense spending encourages or hinders economic growth.

The effect of politics on economic growth in developing societies is assessed, with a focus on the Middle East. The study is the first to add conflict variables to the production function defense-growth model and test them empirically across countries and regions, and .Downloadable!

Scholars have estimated demand functions for national defense spending and investigated international arms trade for a long time. The relationship between supply and demand for military goods has, however, only been examined on aggregate level or in formal models yet.

I investigate how the supply of military goods by arms-producing companies and Author: Johannes Blum, Johannes Blum.